Episode 463: The Fine Print

the fine print

After a week off the “terrific two” have returned with a brand new episode of The Flickcast. The podcast about stuff nerds love. This week it’s Episode 463: The Fine Print.

After some time to rest Chris and Joe get right back to work with discussions, observations and, yes, opinions on various new and recurring topics. So back to the usual shit then? Yes indeed. 

Some of these topics include the new Marvel/Disney+ series Hawkeye, more on Star Trek: Discovery and the nature of Star Trek itself, the new trailer for season two of Raised By Wolves, “work for hire” and how that kinda sucks for creators, Peter Jackson and The Beatles: Get Back and a whole lot more. It’s a big show literally bursting with ideas.

Picks are happening again this week with Chris and Joe both picking the monumental achievement that is The Beatles: Get Back. Yes, it’s over eight hours of The Beatles. Yes, it’s great and yes you should absolutely watch it.

If you like the show, please consider rating or reviewing it on Apple Podcasts, or your podcast app of choice. Every rating or review helps. And if you’re really feeling it, consider become a patron and supporting the show on Patreon. That would be super cool. 

Thanks for listening!

As always, if you have comments, questions, critiques, offers of sponsorship or whatever, feel free to hit us up in the comments, on Twitter, Instagram or, yes, even Facebook. Or shoot us an email. We don’t mind.

 

 

Opening music by GoodB Music under Creative Commons License
End music by Kevin MacLeod under Creative Commons License
Image: Apple Corps Ltd.

Revisiting John Huston: Moby Dick

moby dick

It’s time for another edition of Revisiting John Huston. A semi-regular series where we take a look at the films and career of the legendary director. This week we’re revisiting Huston’s 1956 film Moby Dick, based on the novel by Herman Melville. 

Moby Dick is probably the pinnacle of 1950s Huston. Moving from his ‘40s adaptations of contemporary American pulp (The Maltese Falcon) and popular works (In This Our Life) to more ambitious projects (The African Queen, The Red Badge of Courage, Moby Dick, and, eventually even The Bible), the decade marks a grandiose turn in Huston. It’s a bittersweet transformation, however.

On the one hand, these works have a high spirit of adventure to them that still holds up and stay true to the original material. On the other, they lack the deeper, personal, more profound humanity of his earlier films.

Moby Dick is grounded firmly in the former, and, watching it now in 2010, nearly 55 years after it was made, it’s still a fun watch. Moby Dick is among the finest novels this country has ever produced. It’s held a special place in this English majors’ heart since college, when I took an hour-a-week class on it taught by my grizzled advisor “Uncle” Vic, a mid-fortiesh Virginian with a dusty leather jacket, beady horse eyes, and a half-kempt beard.

The class was only an hour and held once a week. But in it, we exhausted nearly every theme, brought in a biology professor whose specialty was cetology, and garnered an appreciation for Melville’s epic prose.

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Western Wednesdays Again: My Name Is Nobody

my name is nobody

It’s time for another edition of Western Wednesdays Again. This week we’re taking look at director Tonino Valerii’s 1973 film My Name Is Nobody.

My Name Is Nobody looms large among spaghetti western and Sergio Leone fans — and probably Henry Fonda fans too, since it was the last Western this legendary range rider appeared in. The legend of its creation is amusing, and rare among directors who are generally sensitive about the worlds they create. Leone, appalled at the spaghetti western industry that he had wrought, decided to gleefully destroy it with his protege,  Tonio Valerii.

If the Italian western was going to become a joke led by actors dubbing themselves Flint Westwood, then by Tuco they were going to make it the biggest joke of all. And the film certainly is. It’s like Mel Brooks by way of Leone — every sacred scene of Leone’s films is mocked and beaten dead of its coolness.

The only things missing are they never shoot a blonde fellow in a serape, or kick around a guy smoking a big yellow pipe. Perhaps they couldn’t quite bring themselves to do it. There’s a crying clown under all the pranks. When Fonda’s character gives his grand speech about the dying West and its romantic gunslingers, you know Leone, Valerii, and Fonda mean every word of it.

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Episode 462: No Way to Treat a Multiverse

no way to treat a multiverse

It’s time for a brand new episode of The Flickcast. The podcast about stuff nerds love. This week it’s Episode 462: No Way to Treat a Multiverse.

On this week’s brand new episode, Chris and Joe get deep into it with discussions, observations and, yes, opinions on various new and recurring topics. So yet another typical Tuesday? Yep.

Some of these include the latest trailer for Spider-Man: No Way Home, the season finale of the Apple TV+ series Foundation, the season premiere of Star Trek: Discovery, potential plot lines for other Star Trek series, never giving up on your dreams and a whole lot more. And of course, a few random tangents and such. What did you expect?

Picks are happening again this week with Chris’ pick of Chuck Wendig’s novel The Book of Accidents and Joe’s pick of director Edgar Wright’s latest film Last Night in Soho, starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Matt Smith, Thomasin McKenzie, Terrance Stamp and Diana Rigg.

If you like the show, please consider rating or reviewing it on Apple Podcasts, or your podcast app of choice. Every rating or review helps. And if you’re really feeling it, consider supporting the show on Patreon. That would be cool. 

Thanks for listening!

As always, if you have comments, questions, critiques, offers of sponsorship or whatever, feel free to hit us up in the comments, on Twitter, Instagram or, yes, even Facebook. Or shoot us an email. We don’t mind.

 

 

Opening music by GoodB Music under Creative Commons License
End music by Kevin MacLeod under Creative Commons License
Image: CBS/Paramount+

War Movie Mondays Again: First Blood

first blood

It’s time for another edition of War Movie Mondays Again. This time we’re featuring 1982’s First Blood (a.k.a Rambo: First Blood), directed by Ted Kotcheff. The film stars Sylvester Stallone as John Rambo, Brian Dennehy as Sheriff Will Teasle and Richard Crenna as Col. Sam Trautman.

First Blood is based on author David Morrell’s 1972 novel about a Vietnam veteran trying to adapt to civilian life after his horrific experiences during the war as a member of an elite special forces unit. Kotcheff’s film serves as a study of the psyche of veterans and shows the audience the harsh realities many were still facing long after they’d come home.

As the film begins Rambo is a man haunted by his past backpacking through the Pacific northwest of the United States in search of an old Army buddy. Rambo arrives at his friend’s home to discover he’s been dead for over a year due to cancer from exposure to Agent Orange, a defoliant used by the U.S. military during the war. Realizing he’s the last surviving member of his unit and with nowhere to go, he hits the road and ends up in the town of Hope, Washington.

When Rambo enters the town, he is spotted by the town’s sheriff Will Teasle (Dennehy) who asks Rambo where he’s headed, and why he’s passing through. Teasle offers Rambo a ride and escorts him to the city limits. Rambo asks Teasle why he’s against him trying to find something to eat in town.

Teasle explains that he is the law and that he’s paid to keep drifters out. Once dropped off at the outskirts, Rambo begins to head back into town. Teasle arrests Rambo for vagrancy, resisting arrest, and for carrying his signature knife.

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Episode 461: No Time to Podcast

no time to podcast

It’s time for a brand new episode of The Flickcast. The podcast about stuff nerds love. This week it’s Episode 461: No Time to Podcast.

On this week’s brand new episode, Chris and Joe get deep into it with discussions, observations and, yes, opinions on various new and recurring topics. So, another typical Tuesday? Yep.

Some of these include the latest James Bond opus No Time to Die, the recent Marvel superhero blockbuster Shang-Chi and all of the recent announcements at Disney’s “Disney+ Day” such as Moon Knight, Secret Invasion, What If? season two and Agatha: House of Harkness. And of course, some other random “mores” too.

Picks are happening again this week with Chris’ pick of Joe Carnahan’s Copshop and Joe’s pick of the Robert Redford film Sneakers.  Sure, it takes him a minute to get there, but he makes it.

If you like the show, please consider rating or reviewing it on Apple Podcasts, or your podcast app of choice. Every rating or review helps. And if you’re really feeling it, consider supporting the show on Patreon. That would be cool. 

Thanks for listening!

As always, if you have comments, questions, critiques, offers of sponsorship or whatever, feel free to hit us up in the comments, on Twitter, Instagram or, yes, even Facebook. Or shoot us an email. We don’t mind.

 

 

Opening music by GoodB Music under Creative Commons License
End music by Kevin MacLeod under Creative Commons License
Image: Marvel Studios

Episode 460: The Harder They Podcast

the harder they podcast

It’s time for a brand new episode of The Flickcast. The podcast about stuff nerds love. This week it’s Episode 460: The Harder They Podcast.

On this week’s brand new episode, Chris and Joe get deep into it with discussions, observations and, yes, opinions on various new and recurring topics. So, a typical Tuesday then?

A lot of this features The Harder They Fall, the awesome new western starring Jonathan Majors, Idris Elba, Regina King and directed by Jymes Samuel; Marvel’s latest film Eternals; the under appreciated genius of So I Married an Axe Murderer and the latest on the Apple TV+ series Foundation and Invasion. And of course, some other random “mores” too.

Picks are back this week with Chris’ pick of the classic TV series The Wire and Joe’s pick of the series Lost In Space, soon to be dropping its third season on Netflix. Yes, we know Chris has picked The Wire before, but it’s just so damn good he had to pick it again.

If you like the show, please consider rating or reviewing it on Apple Podcasts, or your podcast app of choice. Every rating or review helps. And if you’re really feeling it, consider supporting the show on Patreon. That would be cool. 

Thanks for listening!

As always, if you have comments, questions, critiques, offers of sponsorship or whatever, feel free to hit us up in the comments, on Twitter, Instagram or, yes, even Facebook. Or shoot us an email. We don’t mind.

 

 

Opening music by GoodB Music under Creative Commons License
End music by Kevin MacLeod under Creative Commons License
Image: David Lee / Netflix

Western Wednesdays Again: McCabe and Mrs. Miller

McCabe and mrs miller

It’s time for another edition of Western Wednesday Again where we explore a classic Western film or TV show we love. This week it’s Robert Altman’s 1971 Revisionist Western McCabe and Mrs. Miller.

As a general rule, Westerns tend to be what Sergio Leone labeled “fairy tales for grown-ups.” They may not always be sophisticated, but they reside in a quasi-historical land of cool where even the dust, sweat, and blood seems to be part of the fun. Very few Westerns ever delve into the brutal realities of the frontier.

There’s a good reason for that – misery is not entertaining.  McCabe and Mrs. Miller is proof of the rule. This is not a enjoyable movie. This is the bonechilling reality that underpins all your Western myths, Manifest Destiny, John Ford and Conestoga wagons.

Robert Altman’s unfortunates come before all that. They’re the desperate people scraping a town together for their own profit so that civilization can come in and build over the opium-addicted ashes.

McCabe and Mrs. Miller is a footnote-in-history movie, the kind of story that exists only in dusty judicial records. McCabe (Warren Beatty) arrives in a mining outpost and decides to build a brothel.  Mrs. Miller (Julie Christie, the most beautiful woman alive) gets wind of it, and arrives to muscle in with her superior knowledge. They’re a success, and of course big business gets wind of it, and wants to buy them out. 

McCabe dissembles, and they send in the bounty hunters.  No, it doesn’t end well.

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